I Spot a Patka!

Screen Shot 2013-02-26 at 11.04.20 PMOver the past 48 hours PatkaSpotting.com has gone viral within the online Sikh community. With people expressing strong sentiment both for and against the site, we decided to ask our readers to share their thoughts as well — boy did it get people riled up!

Here are some comments we want to highlight with a few thoughts:

I think grown men should wear turbans. that said, i think putting people’s photos online in order to shame them is really creepy and horrible and reminds me of what happened to Balpreet Kaur bhenjee. and i hope i never offend someone in a way that makes them want to put my photo on their website without my permission!

This sister hit the nail on head! Ah yes, cyber bullying — as social media allows just anyone to become an opinion leader overnight, the lines of privacy, respect and old school bullying appear to be blurring more and more. As a community, we are ultra sensitive to cyber bullying especially after the cases with Balpreet Kaur and Gurpreet Sarin — both of whom were mocked on social media because of the way they look. I agree. As a community, we need to be progressive and stand together. We need to help each other and support each other. It is important that we work together and unify through love and respect. This site, however, weakens the community by directing people’s energy away from topics that actually matter such as Sikh Awareness.

Patka is not only for children, but also sports wear and casual home headcover for some. The “Big Dhari = No Patka” picture is ridiculous. He’s at his home, how do you know he doesn’t wear a turban in public. I, for one, also wear the same patka underneath the turban. But when I come home and take the pagg off I sometimes keep the patka to not expose my hair to my roomies. What’s wrong with keeping it inside your home ?

True! I know many Singhs who wear patkas around the house after work, school, etc. because they wear it under their pugh, but I also know many Singhs who feel a patka is very juvenile and resort to wearing a keski. With that said, do what you want! Quite frankly I don’t know the pictured Singh, so I a rather not assume where he is or when he wears a patka. The reason this comment stuck me is because of the mention of patkas being worn during sports. Yes, patkas are the perfect default sports wear. They are tight and keep your kesh in place. However, when I think of renowned  Sikh athletes, the first person to come to mind is Fauja Singh who I have always seen photographed wearing a full pugh while running marathons. While I agree that patkas are great for sports, I think it is wise for us to realize that patkas aren’t the only available option. Even a keski is good for sports — just look at NCAA basketball player, Darsh Singh!

At least they keep their hair. We should show more solidarity with one another instead of ridiculing each other. This is tasteless. While I agree grown men shouldn’t wear patkas, this isn’t the route to go. How would a non Sikh view this or a young Sikh boy?

I decided to take the liberty to show this site to my 10-year-old brother who immediately responded: But I wear a patka! So, yes, I can understand the confusion this site would cause within the minds of young Sikh boys. However, to default to the statement (that has come up in many comments): “At least they keep their hair,” gets me thinking. Are people really doing society a favor by keeping their kesh? I would hope people keep their kesh because they believe in the principle of what kesh represents — not out of obligation to parents, family, and society at large. If someone keeps their kesh, they really aren’t doing me any favor. I don’t feel obligated to thank them for doing so. Your commitment to the Guru is between you and Guru Sahib, not you and me, you and her or you and him. Get real people. If someone keeps their kesh for others and not themselves, well that right there is an issue in itself.

While we agree with the issue PatkaSpotting.com is trying to highlight, we don’t support the way in which it is trying to address it. We believe the site is counter productive and not progressive by any means. With that said, we also don’t agree with some of the arguments surrounding the site — rather than getting personal, we need to be constructive and think big-picture.

Fresh & Fearless. MizKaurista

5 Comment

  1. Any sikh boy with a patka can be so demoralized by this whole concept. It is non-specific targeted bullying at it’s worst. I am not sikh but my best friend is. He removed his patka and cut his hair after another kid broke his leg for wearing one. So a kid looks up to see a grown man wearing the same head dress as him and gets made fun of by his own community? Just sad. Stop this now, please!

  2. Bullshit! Sikh girls don’t even cover their head or keep their hair and people are angry at Sikh guys for tying patkas. You fools need to wake up and understand Sikhi. Gurbani and Guru Ji states that all Sikhs must keep uncut kesh and cover their kesh. If someone wants to keep kesh and tie a patka, then that is perfectly acceptable according to the Rehit Maryada. The whole concept of wearing a big fat Patiala Shahi pagg that causes headaches was just invented by Sikh parents in Punjab because they had nothing better to do in their spare time but tie turbans all day. It’s America, it’s a free country. I’ll tie my patka/pagg however the F I want to.

  3. “Are people really doing society a favor by keeping their kesh? I would hope people keep their kesh because they believe in the principle of what kesh represents — not out of obligation to parents, family, and society at large. If someone keeps their kesh, they really aren’t doing me any favor. I don’t feel obligated to thank them for doing so. Your commitment to the Guru is between you and Guru Sahib, not you and me, you and her or you and him. Get real people.”

    So, Sardars aren’t doing you a favor by keeping their hair then why do you care how Sardars choose to cover their head? If we aren’t doing you any favors and Sikhi is the relationship between one and Guru Ji, why do you care if I choose to tie a patka or not. Frankly, I think this whole article is bull. So, I’m just going to stop tying my patka when I play sports because some ignorant people in the Sikh community are angry I’m not wearing the proper headgear. Get real Kaurista. We’re not doing you or the community a favor by keeping our hair so don’t bother us if we decide we want to relax our head and tie our patkas. To be frank, mind your own business.

  4. I totally agree with Rick. How can we ask others to stop bullying Sikh people when they are getting bullied by their own community? This whole topic is ridiculous and it does not affect anyone whether someone chooses to wear a patka or pagh so GET OVER IT

  5. Jasvir Singh says:

    It’s sad how little Sikh guys can get away with and how much Sikh girls can get away with. Every Sikh girl I know cuts her hair, shaves and waxes. No one in the Sikh community even says a word to a Sikh girl about keeping hair. I have many Sikh guy friends whose parents expected them to keep full kesh and a dastar but didn’t expect the same from their daughters. What is this? Is this Sikhi? I really have to ask. Now it’s become so bad that people are whining that Sardars are wearing patkas and that doesn’t fit well with the Sikh community. The girl writing these articles is a Sikh girl that has never had to tie/wear a patka or dastar. She has been able to fit in to society since she has been born, everything she says is irrelevant. There are many guys out there that are being pushed to keep hair by their parents/community. If you feel like the parents are wrong for forcing their sons to keep hair then do something about it. The reason no one can do anything about it is because Sikh parents are very stubborn and old school and only want everything their way. Kaurista you fail. What would a Kaur know about growing up Sardar anyhow (unless your parents made you tie a patka/dastar since you were young) ?

Comments are closed.